Picture Zooming

Picture Zooming

Postby gnulab » Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:16 am

Hi,

I was looking at the options and I found these:

    Under Height
    Over Height
    Under Width
    Over Width

under Fit Portrait, Fit Landscape, Fit Screen. Could someone help me understand what are the difference?

I'm trying to achieve that the image will zoom automatically to the maximum width of the monitor.


Thanks
Henry
gnulab
 
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Location: Jakarta, Indonesia

Re: Picture Zooming

Postby Vadel » Tue Sep 23, 2014 1:30 am

If what you want to achieve is to fit each and every image to the screen width (actually, this applies to CDisplay Ex's window width, whether it covers the entire screen width or not), you have to select "Under width" and "Over width" (and leave "Under height" and "Over height" unselected) in both the "Fit portrait" and "Fit landscape" submenus. Also, make sure that the option "Fit to screen" in the "Fit to screen" submenu (yes, same name) is unselected. That's all.

... ... ...

I've written the following full explanation, which you can read if you're interested. As far as I know:

ABOUT "FIT LANDSCAPE/PORTRAIT":
-"Fit landscape" is for fitting landscape images (these are "horizontal" images: images whose horizontal resolution -width- is larger than its vertical resolution -height-).
-"Fit portrait" is for fitting portrait images (these are "vertical" images: images whose vertical resolution -height- is larger than its horizontal resolution -width-).
*I don't know which one of the above two applies when there isn't a landscape image nor a portrait image, but a square image.

ABOUT "UNDER/OVER HEIGHT/WIDTH":
-"Under height" is for fitting to the window height the images whose height is smaller than the window height.
-"Under width" is for fitting to the window width the images whose width is smaller than the window width.
-"Over height" is for fitting to the window height the images whose height is larger than the window height.
-"Over width" is for fitting to the window width the images whose width is larger than the window width.
*Note that the window is usually the entire screen (CDisplay Ex's full screen mode) or almost the entire screen (CDisplay Ex's window maximized).
*Note that the original aspect ratio is always preserved.
*Note that there are situations where two of the selected options among the above four can contradict each other. In this cases the program applies one of the two, and I don't know under what criteria it chooses which one.

A PRACTICAL EXAMPLE:
-Think of a typical page of a manga (I guess this applies to Western comics too): a portrait image ("vertical" image) whose height is larger than the screen height and whose width is smaller than the screen width (I assume here that normal resolutions for a screen are 1366x768, 1600x900, 1920x1080 or 1920x1200).
-The options of CDisplay Ex that affect an image like this are the ones in the "Fit portrait" submenu, since it's a portrait image.
-Then, among the four options there, the ones who will have an effect on our image are "Over height" and "Under width", since the image has a height larger than CDisplay Ex's window height and its width is smaller than CDisplay Ex's window width (I assume here that CDisplay Ex's window is maximized or in full screen mode).
-If you have "Over height" selected, the image will be fit to the window height (so you will see the image smaller than its original size and there will be a lot of background).
-If you have "Under width" selected, it will be fit to the window width (so the image will be seen larger than its original size and there will be no background).
-If you have both of them selected (note that they both contradict each other, especially because aspect ratio is always preserved), it seems that the program applies the effect of "Over height", I don't know exactly why.
*Note that none of the options selected in "Fit landscape" have any effect on this image, because it's not a landscape image.
*Note that the other two options in "Fit portrait", i.e., "Under height" and "Over width", have no effect on this image either.

ABOUT THAT OTHER "FIT TO SCREEN" OPTION:
It's just a way to completely fit the image to the window size (respecting aspect ratio), so the image is seen entirely with no need to scroll or anything. In previous versions of the program, it was just an option that you could enable or disable. Now, apart from enabling/disabling it (done with the first option in the "Fit to screen" submenu, where it says again "Fit to screen"), you can customize the way the image is "fit to screen" by this option, so the four "Under/over height/width" options are there too. It's somewhat redundant. I recommend to leave this option configured as it is by default (i.e., the "Over height" and "Over width" options selected), so that it's purpose is truly (whenever you enable it) to completely fit the image to the window (note again that in most cases "window" is equivalent to "screen") to be able to see it entirely at once without scrolling.

ABOUT THE OPTIONS IN THE TOOLBAR BUTTON:
Maybe you've noticed that you can also configure these things with one of the buttons in the toolbar. I am writing this because this button behaves a bit differently.
-If you click the button itself (not the down arrow next to him), it will apply to the image the selected options in the "Fit to screen" submenu. If you have these options by default, then the image will be completely fit to the window (note again that in most cases "window" is equivalent to "screen") and you'll be able to see it entirely at once without scrolling.
-If you click the down arrow:
a) If the image currently displaying is a landscape image, the "Under/over height/width" options that appear are the very same as the options in the "Fit landscape" submenu of the right-click menu.
b) If the image currently displaying is a portrait image, the "Under/over height/width" options that appear are the very same as the options in the "Fit portrait" submenu of the right-click menu.
Vadel
 
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Re: Picture Zooming

Postby gnulab » Tue Oct 21, 2014 2:26 pm

Thanks for explaining it!
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Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 4:56 am
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